Teaching With Picture Prompts


The New York Times has been publishing images without captions at least once a week since August 2016 and posting the following prompt:

After looking closely at the image, think about these three questions:

• What is going on in this picture?

• What do you see that makes you say that?

• What more can you find?

This process is similar to Notice/Wonder which is really useful in math, science and social studies.

Some examples of the many images on the site.

What’s going on in this picture? Look closely at the image above or view it in a <a href="https://static01.nyt.com/images/2016/02/11/learning/VTS02-22-16LN/VTS02-22-16LN-superJumbo.jpg">larger size</a>, then tell us what you see by posting a comment. On Friday, we will reveal more about the image and its origins at the bottom of this post.

<a href="http://learning.blogs.nytimes.com/?module=BlogMain&action=Click&region=Header&pgtype=Blogs&version=Blog%20Category&contentCollection=U.S."></a>What’s going on in this picture? Look closely at the image above or view it in a <a href="https://static01.nyt.com/images/2014/10/02/learning/VTS10-06-14LN/VTS10-06-14LN-superJumbo.jpg">larger size</a>, then tell us what you see by posting a comment. On Tuesday, we will reveal more about the image and its origins at the bottom of this post.

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One thought on “Teaching With Picture Prompts

  1. I think this is a great pool of images! I have also taken part in a training where they used Norman Rockwell pictures and did the same for ESL. It naturally differentiated between higher and lower learners. I think I also see a lot of science topics in the pictures (maybe climate change for the one with the birds or even the one with people standing in the hallway), and many social studies topics.

    I especially like the last picture (which I wasn’t sure was a picture at all). It would be interesting to ask students what they thought was the question, and why certain blocks were bigger or smaller. This would be especially interesting as a Think, Pair, Share version of Notice/ Wonder. I love it!

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